Tag Archives: Kit Harrington

Game of Thrones Season 3 Recap: “Kissed by Fire”

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Game of Thrones left me in total amazement after last week’s episode “And Now His Watch Has Ended” turned up a return to form with all the action, tension and intrigue that drew me to Game of Thrones so intensely in the first place. The title for this Sunday’s episode “Kissed by Fire” brought about two assumptions in my mind; one assumption was that Melisandre’s intentions would be a key unveiling, and the other was that Ygritte and Jon may end up sharing a pretty unexpected moment of passion that endeared so many who have read A Storm of Swords. Were these assumptions correct? Did the exhilarating action continue? How much fire would we see? Find out below!

Warning: Spoilers Throughout!

The thirst for fire was quenched straight out of the gates. It is safe to say that the Beric vs Sandor duel didn’t disappoint a single soul; from the blood fire sword prop, to Beric’s hasty resurrection, everything in this scene was simply a flawless fan service. The pacing was handled perfectly by the editing team. The action was never too fast which averted any potential confusion on who was dominating the fight at any given moment. The shot framing was also masterful on occasion, the shot from behind Beric as he knelt with Sandor’s sword buried in his shoulder stood out as a superb example of the cinematographers profound talents. This fight scene, and the discussion between Arya and Beric that followed later further cemented my belief in Richard Dormer being the perfect casting choice for Beric, as he once more demonstrated a decent depth of understanding the character’s niches.

Proceeding that little stint, we were taken beyond The Wall where Ygritte and Jon’s story strolled back onto our screens. Jon still finds himself an untrustworthy ‘companion’ amongst the Wildlings – despite Tormund beginning to take a liking to him- which is particularly causing tensions to rise between him and the skinchanger Orell. Admits their argument the subject of Orell’s control of his eagle beyond the dead was mentioned, you can’t help but ask yourself, why?

Putting violent tension aside, the sexual tension between Ygritte and Jon collapsed as they finally consummated their relationship. Kit Harrington marvelously portrayed Jon’s sudden, new found affections for Ygritte which may have a later impact on his loyalties as a man of The Night’s Watch, whose vow of celibacy he forsook so contently. Rose Leslie carried out her part in the scene with total finesse, delivering a very endearing couple of lines about never wanting to leave the cave with Jon, keeping these lines from the books was a brilliant choice. The weight of those words could be felt ten fold in weeks to come.

vlcsnap-2013-04-29-10h37m02s177An excellent piece of cinematography from the Beric vs Sandor duel.

Jamie and Brienne found their road trip had come to an end as they were finally forked over to Roose Bolton at Harrenhall. Jamie, his stump now a weight of rot, was taken to the ‘maester’ Qyburn’s (Anton Lesser) quarters where-in we were tossed a bone of intrigue, as we came about the knowledge of Qyburn’s likely rather twisted experiments that forced the citadel to confiscate his maester’s chain and remove him from their order. It is almost definitely too early to call it straight out, but I’m seeing the potential in Lesser’s performance, which came with an essential air of chilling mystery.

Subsequent to his excruciating treatment at the hands of Qyburn, Jamie dropped by the great baths to freshen up and have quite the exchange with Brienne. Jamie’s character defining monologue concerning his slaughtering of the Mad King- that although appeared treasonous on the surface, was undoubtedly an act of heroism if ever there was one – was impeccably delivered by Nikolaj Coster-Waldau. If he isn’t showered with awards for that monologue I will consider it a crime, film makers please take note of this man’s talents! The mise-en-scene during this sequence was of a sublime quality; the gradually nearing proximity between Jamie and Brienne was a great way of showing progression in their relationship, and the set, although not extravagant, was an almost an exact translation of how I imagined the room when reading the scene in A Storm of Swords.

In spite of this I feel that the emphasis on why Jamie ultimately collapsed in pain wasn’t there, a fault which I think lies at the feet of either the editing team or the cinematographers. In A Storm of Swords, if I remember correctly, Jamie ends up fainting when he knocks his injured stump on the side of the pool, no cut to a close up of this happening was included despite Nikolaj seemingly acting it out, which unfortunately took away the effect of, and reason behind him fainting.

vlcsnap-2013-04-29-10h39m56s144Nikolaj delivering his faultless monologue, note the great shot palette!

In the capital, Tyrion manage to ween Olenna round to accepting to pay up for the Tyrell half of the royal wedding, despite her successful efforts to outwit the imp, who had a pretty rough time of things in this installment.  Tywin unveiled to our favourite dwarf that he was to have Sansa’s hand in marriage (surprisingly to his annoyance) in the vain attempt of stopping the Tyrell plot to have her marry Loras (who will now be preoccupied with Cersei), giving their family the key to The North – of course that is if you believe in the notion of Robb’s coming demise. Littlefinger’s retrieval of this invaluable information through his network of informants suitably portrayed the sheer danger he presents to the stability of Westeros, if he stands to gain any more power and position.

Regardless of the interesting plot and character developments I was thrown off by the very sudden, almost rushed, pacing of the shots that made the supposedly climactic unveiling of the coming marriage’s a little underwhelming. Had a few of these scenes been strewn about in earlier parts of the episode, the build up of tension and the unfolding of the machination would have served a far greater dramatic purpose.

Meanwhile in Riverrun, Robb found himself very preoccupied with throwing his war efforts to the dogs. His follies, including his fatal lack of patience with the belligerent Lord Karstark, have left him with just half the force he once possessed. Robb’s ambition clearly didn’t let those dreadful facts deter him from his goal, as he revealed a new plan to seize the under-defended Lannister seat of Casterly Rock, provided of course he can acquire the necessary troops from Lord Walder Frey, the man whose marriage pact he chose ever so stupidly to ignore. Fat chance of him garnering those troops, hey?

vlcsnap-2013-04-29-10h37m30s188Jon & Ygritte sharing a moment. You’ll likely see this on Tumblr.

“Kissed by Fire” granted Stannis long awaited quality time with the fans, thankfully upholding his character’s image as a strict, honorable and stubborn individual this time around. Stannis the Mannis briefly dropped in on his bat shit crazy wife, Selyse Baratheon (Sarah Mackeever). Selyse really needs to work on her rooms Feng Shui; keeping your stillborn children in great jars of green liquid wont warrant any guests coming to visit, and evidently it doesn’t do much for your mental well being either. I’m not sure if whether me questioning the likelihood of people being able to preserve bodies like that is a bit redundant considering the whole dragon thing, but it was definitely something that bothered me nevertheless.

Stannis’s daughter Shireen was a polar opposite to her mother, ignoring the rather creepy song she was singing before Stannis entered her chamber, she was actually very sweet; the greyscale that mutated her face was pieced together perfectly by the make-up department, who I honestly though might fuck it up. It may be helpful to note for those of you who haven’t read the books, greyscale is an infectious skin disease that people obviously prefer to avoid – explaining why Shireen’s quarters were so isolated. The friendship between her and Davos was an unexpected deviation, but like many deviations made this season it was a wholly worthwhile one, their heart felt exchange that highlighted Davos’s illiteracy ended with great sound bridging of dialogue concerning Aegon the Conqueror into Daenerys brief scene.

Daenerys travels through Essos continued, unfortunately nothing particularly astounding happened aside from a bit of subtle probing between Barristan and Jorah, and the showcasing of the Unsullied’s first freely elected leader Grey Worm, who supplied his own little monologue that sadly didn’t really have shit on Jamie’s earlier ravings.

Final Rating: B+

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Game of Thrones Season 3 Recap: “The Walk of Punishment”

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The third season of the now legendary HBO fantasy drama Game of Thrones has gotten off to a spectacular, albeit slow start that has begun to slightly divide opinions amongst fans of the brilliant show. The Walk of Punishment, although only the third entry into the series, perhaps needed to kick the pace up a notch to avoid alienating those viewers who have quickly grown tired of the world building and scene setting that takes up far more time in the book series. Could The Walk of Punishment deliver on much needed, new found action whilst retaining all the cunning and intrigue that makes Game of Thrones such an intelligent piece of programming?

Warning, Spoilers Throughout!

The highlight of The Walk of Punishment in my eyes was Podrick’s induction to manhood courtesy of Tyrion’s generosity and the shady service provided by Littlefinger, otherwise known to Bronn as “Lord Twat-beard”. Although the two scenes had no real relevance in helping to further push the story, they gave Podrick’s character a far greater, desperately needed depth in comparison to his book series counterpart, whilst allowing for some much appreciated banter between the frat like duo of Tyrion and Bronn. Dinklage and Flynn have an utterly uncanny chemistry that translates perfectly through their characters, generating some of the wittiest banter you will find on television.  Hopefully the great mystery of Podrick’s free tumble at the brothel will be unraveled in next weeks episode.

vlcsnap-2013-04-15-10h28m44s109Podrick getting probed for his secrets by Bronn and Tyrion.

Extra hilarity was found in the surprisingly revealing small council meeting scene when Cersei and Tyrion played their own version of musical chairs. In the very same council meeting Littlefinger’s assignment to woo and wed Lysa Tully -consequently bringing the armies of The Vale into the war on the Lannister side – was revealed. Unbeknownst to Tywin and the rest of the small council Littlefinger also has a promise to Sansa to set her free of Kings Landing, a trip to the Eyrie provides a very good opportunity for King’s Landing’s number one deviant to achieve both of his goals.

Moving from King’s Landing to the Riverlands, Arya’s road trip with The Brotherhood without Banners (BWB) took an unexpectedly depressing turn for the worse. Following Hot Pie’s demonstration of his mean bread baking skill he unveiled to Arya and Gendry he was going to take up the offer of working for the innkeeper, putting an end to his travels with the rag tag band.  The translation of the event from the book to the screen was outstanding; Hot Pie’s dialogue and gift of the bread wolf to Arya almost broke me, which was completely unexpected because it contrasted the ‘none of us really give a shit’ vibe that I took from the event in A Storm of Swords.
Props to Ben Hawkley and Masie Williams for their meticulous acting efforts.

vlcsnap-2013-04-15-10h20m13s144Bread baker and professional bullshitter Hot Pie parting ways.

Over at Riverrun two major members of the Tully household – Catelyn’s brother Edmure (Tobias Menzies) and her uncle Brynden the Blackfish (Clive Russell) – got their delayed introduction. Edmure’s folly at his father Hoster’s funeral, and the chastising he took from Robb (who has finally flaunted his fierce leadership skills) successfully portrayed his complete ineptitude at doing anything that requires the slightest bit of competence. On the other hand we had the Blackfish, who in overcoming the issue with his short time on screen, fully came across as the absolute boss he is portrayed to be in the books. Clive Russell deserves a lot of the praise for making that happen, without any dialogue given to him in the funeral scene he still managed to come across as a bad ass on his actions alone.

That said the screenwriters Benioff & Weiss penned some brilliant lines that really developed the character, including this particular line that sprang to mind: “It often comforts me to think that even in war’s darkest days, in most parts of the world, absolutely nothing is happening.” Unfortunately far less can be said of other pieces of dialogue in the episode. Stannis and Melisandre’s brief exchange left me pretty disgusted with how creepy and out of character Stannis’s behavior was. There is no way Stannis the Mannis would grovel away so desperately, his character’s concern with honorability is far too established for the thought to even cross his mind.

vlcsnap-2013-04-15-10h23m09s59Missandei alongside her new master, Daenerys Stormborn.

Jamie & Brienne’s capture yielded the grandest dramatics in The Walk of Punishment. Brienne’s misfortune of being a female captive meant that she was almost certainly going to be raped by the captors from House Bolton, a startling moment of compassion and vague wit from Jamie saved her from molestation and murder, albeit this compassion unfortunately landed him in a hefty amount of shit. Locke wasn’t going to bow down to the looming threat of Jamie’s feared father Tywin, to make his feelings clear he made quick work of chopping off Jamie’s sword hand which I’m certain came as a jugular surprise to those yet to read the books. Having no sword hand presents a lot of problems for a man almost solely revered because of his swordsmanship, therefore positive character development is the obvious next stage for the leader of the Kings guard. I can see Jamie quickly rising to the place of fan favourite in episodes to come.

Daenerys and The Night’s Watch both look dead set on starting some serious shit that unfortunately wasn’t given the chance to unfold this week. Daenerys came to a decision that in order to secure the unsullied she would have to trade the black dragon Drogon with the slavers. Initially this will have seemed like a real ‘wtf are you doing’ level of decision making, then it clicks in, how do you chain and enslave a dragon with a free will and the abilities to fly and breath fire? Daenerys has a nasty surprise cooking for the slavers of Astapor that’s for certain. Meanwhile beyond The Wall, The Night’s Watch made their return to the vile wildling Craster’s Keep. Hostility and tension have raised in place of the mannerisms and courtesies they demonstrated during their first visit. These hostilities look certain to bring imminent acts of violence that could divide The Watch, which is something they could do without considering the now ever present threat of the wildling army.

Final Thoughts: Unfortunately those fans irritated by the seasons slow start will likely be in little better a mood following The Walk of Punishment as it was another episode dedicated to building up the tension for later events in the plot to unfold. In spite of this fact I truly loved The Walk of Punishment and I think to criticize it for contributing to the seasons ‘slow’ start is to be a little unappreciative of just how perfect the plot developments, political intrigue and humor were in this installment. If you disagree with me or would otherwise like to share your thoughts on the newest episode, feel free to leave them in the comments section below!

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